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FDIC Warns of Fraudulent Emails - September 2, 2011

On September 2, 2011, the FDIC issued a warning to banks and consumers regarding fraudulent emails claiming to be from the FDIC.

The fraudulent messages state:

"Dear clients,

Your account ACH and WIRE transaction have been temporarily suspended for security reasons due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest installations read the document (pdf) attached below.

As soon as it is setup, you transaction abilities will be fully restored.

Best Regards, Online Security department, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

The e-mails contain an attachment "" that will likely release malicious software if opened. These e-mails and attachments are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider these e-mails an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT open the attachment.

Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that these fraudulent e-mails may be modified over time with other subject lines, sender names, and narratives. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers, nor does the FDIC request bank customers to install software upgrades. Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents, and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 3501 North Fairfax Drive, CH-11034, Arlington, Virginia 22226, or transmitted electronically to Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at

The ECOA prohibits creditors from discriminating against credit applicants on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age (providing the applicant has the capacity to enter into a binding contract); because all or part of the applicants income derives from any public assistance program; or, because the applicant has in good faith exercised any right under the Consumer Credit Protection Act.

The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, enacted by Congress in 1975 and made permanent in 1988, requires depository and non-depository lenders to collect and publicly disclose information about housing-related loans and applications for such loans, including several applicant/borrower characteristics. This includes geographic distribution of loans and applications; ethnicity, race, sex, and income of applicants and borrowers; and information about loan approvals and denials. HMDA is implemented by the Federal Reserve Board’s Regulation C (12 CFR Part 203) and a staff commentary (12 CFR Part 203, Supp. I).

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